MMF - Multimode Fiber

Over View

  • An optical fiber is a single, hair-fine filament drawn from molten silica glass. These fibers are often used as the transmission medium in high-speed, high-capacity communications systems that convert information into light, which is then transmitted via fiber optic cable.
     

  • Optical fiber is composed of three key elements: Core, Cladding and Coating. The core is the innermost part of the fiber through which light pulses are guided. Cladding surrounds the core to keep light in the center of the fiber. The core and cladding are inseparable layers of glass. The coating is a layer of polymer that surrounds the cladding to protect the glass.
     

  • Optical fiber cable may be Single mode, Multimode or a hybrid of two or more media types.

Multimode Fiber

In general, multimode fiber (MMF) allows a less expensive system (because the components other than the fiber itself are generally less expensive), but provides less bandwidth and distance capabilities than single mode fiber (SMF) systems. However, since the distance and bandwidth capabilities of MMF are generally sufficient for premises applications, MMF is the most common type used for backbone and horizontal runs within buildings and campus environments.

Multimode fiber cables include the following:

a) 62.5/125 multimode - 62.5 micron core, 125 micron cladding

  • Typical light source is light emitting diode (LED) operating at 850 nm or 1300 nm

  • 62.5/125 - Standard

b) 50/125 multimode - 50 micron core, 125 micron cladding

  • Typical light source is light emitting diode (LED) operating at 850 nm or 1300 nm

  • 50/125 Standard

c) 50/125 laser optimized multimode - 50 micron core, 125 micron cladding

  • Typical light source is vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) operating at 850 nm.

  • 50/125 10G-150 for 10 Gigabit Ethernet up to 150m

  • 50/125 10G-300 for 10 Gigabit Ethernet up to 300m

  • 50/125 10G-550 for 10 Gigabit Ethernet up to 550m